How To Start a YouTube Channel – with Yoga With Adriene

How To Start a YouTube Channel

Ever since the first 30 Days of Yoga series, life has been a blur. I somehow forgot (or never knew) that these videos existed. They were produced by YouTube as part of the Creator Academy. Adriene talks about how to start a YouTube Channel and how to turn your viewers into dedicated fans.

We’ve learned a lot since these videos were recorded but everything we’re doing now is built on the foundation that she talks about in these videos. So, whether you’re already a YouTuber or are just thinking about starting a YouTube channel – they’re definitely worth the few minutes it will take to watch them.

If these videos piqued your interest and you’d like to know more behind-the-scenes info about how we started the Yoga With Adriene channel, check out this episode of Audio on Video – recorded right around the same time.

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We’ve Been Making YouTube Videos for over 5 Years!

Hilah Cooking 5 year anniversary

When I decided to start making videos for the internet, I didn’t have an amazing plan in place. In fact I had no plan. Other than the video production side of things, I really had no idea what I was doing. But I was fascinated by the possibilities of creating videos for YouTube.

So we went for it. We figured things out as we went along. We made lots of new friends. It became our full-time job.

Now, we’ve been making videos for YouTube (primarily) for over 5 years. Pretty crazy. This anniversary made me realize that I’ve been making Hilah Cooking videos longer than I’ve actually held down any of the “real” jobs in my career.

The anniversary also drove home the fact that I was feeling a little bit burned out. So was Hilah. As of January 1st 2015, we had made 375 videos for the Hilah Cooking channel. That doesn’t include all the videos we’ve made for companies like Tastemade and Ulive.

Since the beginning, I had been obsessed with creating the perfect show format. A format that was quick to produce and that could almost be automated. We made small tweaks to the format over time but had pretty much turned the operation into a video making machine. We did everything exactly the same way every time we shot and could produce the episodes very quickly. This allowed us to at times launch 3 videos per week.

This is something I always recommend people do when developing a format for their show.

It works. But we had lost the creative energy that was so exciting when we first started out.

Last summer, we cranked up the “machine” and got way ahead of schedule so that we could take a few months of baby vacation. For most of that time, we seriously thought that we might have reached an end point. That we were done making new videos. We would leave the channel up but concentrate on the website and on Hilah’s opportunities as on-screen talent for other companies. We definitely had lost the passion for making more “stand-and stir” videos.

As we mulled over the decision, it didn’t feel quite right to just stop. We had spent 5 years building and cultivating this thing. We loved the community that had developed around the show. And we still loved making videos together. Just not the videos we had already made hundreds of.

So instead of quitting, we’ve decided to break the channel.

Here’s a video that tells the story of how Hilah and I got started on YouTube and where we plan on taking Hilah Cooking in the future.

7 Ways to Make YouTube More Awesome For Creators

Last week the my inbox and social media feeds got absolutely hammered with articles about how YouTube makes $4 Billion dollars but isn’t profitable and is probably in big trouble because Vessel is going to be huuuuuuge.

Since I’ve been following James Altucher’s daily practice of writing down 10 ideas every day, my mind immediately shifted to thinking of things YouTube could to do make their service more awesome (and profitable).

Before I get started with my awesome ideas on how YouTube could make more money, let me just say… I love YouTube.

If I hadn’t started making YouTube videos, I would still be sitting in a cubicle like a chump for 8 hours a day wondering if my after-work trip to the liquor store was going to cause any over draft fees. I am not exaggerating when I say that making videos on YouTube has completely changed my life.

Ultimately, I don’t think it matters if YouTube loses money. It is of such cultural importance right now that Google should just be focused on not screwing it up. I know everybody is excited about Facebook Video and Twitter Video and instaVideo and Vessel and whatever the next YouTube killer is, but let’s keep our eye on the ball, people.

For internet video, YouTube is where it’s happening.

Here is my “wish list” for YouTube. Most of these are geared towards people who are using YouTube professionally but all of them could work towards building more revenue streams and increasing the amount of time viewers spend on-site.

  1. Easier Way To Promote Videos. I know lots of creators would be more than willing to pay money to promote their videos via paid advertising on YouTube. But the system is wayyyyyy too complicated. Create something similar to the Facebook BOOST feature. Make it ridiculously easy to boost a video and creators will use this like crazy.
  2. Paid Verification System— Creators spend way too much time filing copyright complaints. Let creators pay YouTube for a “seal of approval.” This seal of approval would give channels an extra edge in the ContentID system. When I report stolen content?—?which I have to do every week?—?my tickets would be escalated. This would also give my channels an edge when they are falsely reported for using content I have the rights to use. Speeding up the process for resolving these disputes and false flags could save creators thousands of dollars in lost revenue.
  3. Built-in Transcription and Closed Captioning Service. Bolt a service on to your existing Captions feature that would allow creators to pay to have the videos professionally transcribed. Right now just about everybody sends their videos to Speechpad or Fiverr for transcriptions. I would pay more to be able to click a button and not have to worry about it again. Plus, making it easier to have high quality closed captions is just the right thing to do.
  4. Let Viewers Subscribe to Shows (not just channels). Right now the whole YouTube ecosystem is based on channels. But lots of channels have different shows running on them. If viewers had the option to subscribe to shows rather than just channels, it would create an infinitely better viewing experience. It would also allow creators to experiement with different types of content on the same channel without the worry of alienating their regular audience.
  5. Viewer Dashboard. If you want viewers to come to YouTube and stick around, give them more options to see what they really want. Create an awesome viewer homepage that people can customize with the shows and channels they really want to see. You could still save a slot for promoted and recommended posts. Your alogorithms could probably even serve these up even more effectively with all the additional user data.
  6. Give Channels More Customization Options. Right now creators are focused on getting their viewers off of YouTube and onto their own sites. It’s a lot of extra work, but the current channel options are so limited there is really no other choice. Let creators turn their channels into mini-sites. Give us an incentive to drive more traffic to YouTube rather than to our own websites. Let me give people bonus content for subscribing. Bring back the feature where I could include a little advertisement on my channel pages. This is another service I would happily pay lots of money for.
  7. YouTube for Business. Similar to the Google Apps for Work, a white-label version of YouTube would be amazing. The infrastructure is already there, but it would be amazing to have business class features on top of it. I’m already paying for Vimeo and Wistia for my projects that are off-YouTube. But it would be great to have some of those high end features on top of YouTube’s streaming infrastructure.

Not all of these ideas will be for everybody, but they are all things I would implement right away.

Thanks for indulging my early morning brainstorming! What new features do you think would make YouTube a better place?

YouTube Black Book is now Available

ytblackbook-3DI announced at the end of last year that I was about to release a book all about my experiences creating YouTube channels. You may remember that I even sent out an email asking for your questions so I could make sure I wasn’t missing anything important.

I really had been working hard on the book for several months. By late January, I was finally at the finish line… but then … I choked.

Everything was finished except for the conclusion. Two or three paragraphs and a click of the EXPORT button are all that stood in the way of it being launched it into the world. But instead of doing that, I shut everything down and hoped nobody would remember that I said I was going to release a book.

Fortunately, YOU remembered. And you kept sending me emails asking if the book was ever going to be released.

In one of these emails, somebody called me out as potentially suffering from Imposter Syndrome. I hadn’t heard of it so I looked it up. Here’s how Wikipedia describes it:

… a psychological phenomenon in which people are unable to internalize their accomplishments. Despite external evidence of their competence, those with the syndrome remain convinced that they are frauds and do not deserve the success they have achieved. Proof of success is dismissed as luck, timing, or as a result of deceiving others into thinking they are more intelligent and competent than they believe themselves to be.

Nailed it!

Imposter System had completely crippled me when it came to writing about YouTube stuff. It’s even responsible for the lack of blog posts here.

That email diagnosing me hit my inbox just as I was finishing up my YouTube Certification and I actually thought about it as I was finishing the final exam. I was blazing through the answers and feeling pretty good about myself. And I realized that I really needed to finish the YouTube Book.

After not having looked at it for months, I opened the book file again and read it. To my surprise, it was pretty awesome. And so close to being finished that it was ridiculous. I got back to work … added a few new sections, … updated everything … and finally wrote the conclusion.

I really couldn’t have finished it without the amazing amount of help from Hilah. She read and edited multiple rounds of revisions and gave an incredible amount of general help and encouragement. (She also may have written the sections on Instagram and Pinterest.)

So I’m happy to announce that YouTube Black Book is now available as an Amazon Kindle Book. If you don’t have a Kindle, you can read it on your phone or on a computer. I wanted to make this book affordable for and accessible for everybody who wants to read it — but I also wanted to use it to test out some theories I have about Amazon.

This book is designed to pick up where all the “official” YouTube training leaves off. It focuses more on the big picture rather than specific tactics. It also goes into a lot of detail behind-the-scenes of both the Hilah Cooking and Yoga With Adriene channels.

You’ll get free updates forever. I plan to update this book at least once a year.

So grab a copy. Tell your friends. And let me know what you think!

Thank you!

If the book is helpful to you, please take a minute and leave a review on Amazon. It will really help out a lot!

Gear Update (2014) – Down-Sized Edition

Canon C100

2014 may be another personal record-breaker for me as far as the number of videos I produce. It will definitely be a record breaker when it comes to the number of minutes produced. Even though I am producing more, I have started to downsize the amount of gear I use.

Last year, I went a little bit overboard. I had been using nothing but consumer camcorders for years. As soon as money started coming in from my various projects, I did what any self-respecting video geek would do – I started buying gear! It was fun but I ended up with too much stuff that ended up bogging down things when it came to production. There were too many options and too many things to think about. I am still a mciro-budget producer and almost always a one-man crew. Time is always of the essence and I already have too much on my mind. So I started to downsize.

My production set-up is now what you see in the photo above. For outdoor shoots, that is the whole thing (except for a collapsible bounce-card that I use when I have someone on-set helping me). We just produced the 5-hour EMPOWER yoga class with this set-up.

A-CAM: Canon C-100. I absolutely love this camera and if 4K wasn’t looking, would have already bought a second one. After spending just a few hours with this camera, I never wanted to shoot with a DSLR again. This is easily my favorite out of all the cameras I’ve owned so far. The only big downside is the viewfinder which is terribly designed and feels really out of place considering how great the rest of the camera is. The flip-out monitor isn’t so great either.

B-CAM: Canon T5i. As much as I love the C-100, I am stuck operating this one most of the time because I use this for tighter shots. If I go very wide on this one the image is way too soft to cut together with the C-100 footage. Close-ups and even medium shots are sharp enough. For an entry-level camera it has performed really well. It’s funny how much better the flip-out monitor is compared to the C100. This camera replaced the Canon 60D that I used for years. I think I just wore it out. I took it in for repairs but it had so many issues the repair guy told me it wasn’t worth fixing. It still works great for stills but overheats or shuts down immediately if I try to shoot video. RIP.

Sennheiser G3 Wireless Lav System. I’ve been using this for quite awhile. I actually have two kits now in case I need to do an interview. I’ve got absolutely nothing bad to say about this kit. I’ve even dropped the receiver a few times but thanks to the solid construction it still works great.

RODE Videomic Pro. I don’t actually use any of the audio from this mic. It serves as a cleaner reference track. This helps FCPX really nail the synchronization of the footage.

Zacuto Z-Finder. I’m not crazy about the Z-Finder but when shooting outside it’s the only way I can see what I’m doing.

Manfrotto 701 HDV Head with 755XB Tripod Legs. These are great lightweight tripods. They’re a little TOO lightweight for the C100 but the ease of set-up and transport make up for it.

That’s all I use when shooting outside. It’s easy to transport and quick to set-up and tear down. I use the same configuration when shooting inside but I add three lights.

Fotodiox Pro LED 508 A. This is a cheap Litepanels knock-off but it does the job. I especially like that it comes with a case and batteries. All you need is a light stand.

Linco Softboxes. I hate softboxes because they are normally just too much work to set-up. Linco has a great design that works like an umbrella. The only part that’s time consuming is screwing in all the lightbulbs. These lights are great for creating big soft areas of light. They also come with cases which is turning into a big selling point for me.

So that’s my current production setup. For the evolution of my Gear check out these posts:

If you have any questions, please leave a comment below. And I’d LOVE to hear what gear you use to produce your videos.  Leave a comment and tell me all about it. The comments section has hereby been declared a safe place for Camera geek discussion.

 

Consistency is Key to Building a Successful YouTube Channel

Content is King is a popular concept in the world of bloggers and internet content creators. Apparently it was first used in an article by Bill Gates wayyyy back in 1996. The concept of the original article was quite prescient. Unfortunately, a lot of content creators have pulled that slogan and put a Field of Dreams spin on it: “If you create content, they will come.”

Since you’re reading this post, I’m sure you are already convinced of the importance of creating and owning content, but what good is your content if nobody can find it. For building a successful YouTube channel, I’ve found that Consistency is one of the most critical factors.

There are countless things to think about when planning the content for YouTube. Over the past year, I’ve been experimenting with quantity, quality, upload times, scheduling and even not publishing anything. I’ve found that implementing a clock-work like schedule can help to increase views, audience engagement and subscribers.

Last summer, I decided to see if publishing more videos would increase overall channel views and subscribers. We ramped up publishing frequency for both of the main channels I produce. At Hilah Cooking, we published three videos a week. For Yoga With Adriene we attempted two a week but didn’t always make it. Even though we had increased the amount of content, our publishing schedule was inconsistent.

It was a LOT of work, but I figured it would be worth it if it boosted all our numbers.

It didn’t.

Here’s what our views look like for the last part of 2013. We published videos on Monday, Wednesday and Friday evenings, but not always at the same time.

Hilah Cooking 2014 Publishing Schedule

Looking at December is particularly disheartening. We published 5 videos per week to take advantage of the holiday season when food/recipe traffic is normally really high. The videos were great and we weren’t slacking on quality, but it was still a flop. I believe we were publishing TOO MUCH content for our audience to consume and this was causing our engagement and watch time to drop – which means these videos were not getting pushed out in Subscriber Feeds or Related/Recommended Video feeds.

By the beginning of 2014 we were burned out and took some time off. When we had regrouped we made the decision to publish once per week – every Friday at 7:00p Central Time. Here’s what the analytics look like since making that decision:

Hilah Cooking 2014 publishing schedule

It takes a few weeks before anything becomes noticeably different. There was a peak when we release the first new (heavily promoted video) but then there are minor upticks on the days we released new videos. Nothing crazy. Then after we hit this publishing schedule on a consistent basis for four weeks, the peaks start to get regularly higher and now we are exceeding our previous publishing day numbers.

So what’s going on here? Are we just picking better video topics and optimizing the videos better?

Nope.

The views we’re getting on publish days are NOT via the search feature. Instead, they’re coming from subscribers feeds and the What To Watch area of their logged-in home pages. Engagement with a channels videos is one of the key factors for how these are selected. So two things are happening:

  1. Our subscribers have come to expect a video is coming at a specific time. They watch the video (engagement).
  2. YouTube picks up on this engagement and delivers more of our videos to the subscribers during those key engagement times.

We also get a nice boost in subscribers during this time period.

I’ve seen similar growth on the Yoga With Adriene channel. Here’s what the views look like for Yoga With Adriene in 2014 since implementing our once per week schedule:
Yoga With Adriene 2014 Publishing Schedule

January is traditionally an awesome month for traffic in the fitness and health niche but it starts to drift downward in March. But this isn’t the case here. The consistent schedule increased engagement across the board.

KEY TAKEAWAY: If you’re creating content on a regular basis, publish it on a regular basis down to the exact time of day. Use your analytics to look at certain times when your subscribers are engaging with your content, pick something that looks good and then stick with it for at least three months.

5 Things I Learned at “YouTube Camp”

Last summer, YouTube asked Hilah and I if we wanted to take part in a top-secret program. The program involved three trips to LA to go to workshops and shoot collaboration videos with other YouTubers at YouTube Space LA. It sounded like summer camp for internet video creators. Of course, we said yes.

I’ve alluded to my recent batch of LA trips, but because it was a top-secret program, we couldn’t talk about it or even say what it was called. Until now. YouTube has finally spilled the beans with the video above and I’m happy to report that we were participants in the first ever YouTube Creator Accelerator — and that it was an incredible experience.

There were some really great workshops, but – just like summer camp – the real lessons were things I learned from hanging out with other YouTube Creators (and pestering YouTube staff with questions about my analytics).

Here are my 5 big takeaways from “YouTube Camp”:

1. YouTube Space LA is Worth The Trip.

youtubespace

In case you’re not familiar with it, YouTube Space LA is a huge production facility that YouTube has built to help improve the quality of YouTube videos. For someone who started out shooting and cutting on 16mm film, this place feels like a utopian film school.

There are several huge studios to shoot in, smaller green screen studios, a post production area with workstations for editing and motion graphics and just about every kind of camera you could possibly want to shoot with. The building was once an airplane hangar where Howard Hughes built the Spruce Goose. It’s been complete remodeled with a Google-sized budget and they did a beautiful job. Everything is still brand-new and in great condition.

Hilah Cooking at the youTube Space
Hilah goofing around at the YouTube Space

You can use the Space for free if you have over 10,000 subscribers and have taken a workshop. The only other qualifications are that the videos you create be approved by the legal team and premiere on YouTube first. They also have open Happy Hours on Friday afternoons which are great for connecting and networking with other video creators.

TIP: If you’re close to LA, I would highly recommend signing up for a workshop or just making an appearance at the next Happy Hour. The Space and the staff who work there and the people who use it will definitely inspire you.

2. Watch Time. Watch Time. Watch Time.

In the workshops, one concept was hammered home over and over again: Watch Time. This is the metric to pay attention to right now. If you want your videos to rank well in YouTube’s search engine you can forget about thumbs up, social signals and even subscriber and view counts. YouTube wants people to stay on YouTube for as long as possible so they can watch as many ads as possible and Google can make as much money as possible.

watch time graph

You also get “credit” for session time. I’m not totally clear on the details of this, but even sending viewers to other channels helps you out to some degree.

TIP:If you want your videos to rank well, make things that people spend a lot of time watching. That’s why video game play-throughs do so well. Make playlists, do series of related videos, interlink between your videos with annotations and do whatever you can to keep them watching.

3. Use End Cards to Keep Viewers Engaged

End Cards are the graphics at the end of your videos that you can use as a Call To Action. Popular uses for them are to ask people to subscribe, check out another video or click through to a website. For most of my YouTube “career,” I’ve been really lazy when it comes to end cards.

We did a deep-dive into our channel with a member of the YouTube Analytics team. While almost everything was positive, she pointed out that we had a lot viewers bouncing off about a minute before the end of each video. It seemed to be pretty consistent across our videos and when we looked closer we pinpointed that people were leaving the video as soon as the recipe was complete. Our videos tended to spend another minute or so wrapping up. So we changed our video format and added annotations to subscribe and check out other videos as soon as the recipe was complete. We basically moved our end card stuff to inside the video. This has actually helped our overall watch time and boosted our rate of new subscribers.

YouTube End Cards
We moved our “end cards” to before the end of the video.
TIP: Check the watch time for your videos and see when people are clicking away. Put an end card or some other kind of call to action before the big drop-off. If they’re going to leave the video, send them somewhere else on your channel or even to somewhere else on YouTube. Keep them watching.

4. Beware Content ID

The number one concern of the creators in this program was: How Do I Make More Money?

The number two concern: How do I keep my videos getting flagged with Content ID claims?

The Content ID situation at YouTube is very serious and I’m not confident it will be resolved quickly. Content ID is the system that allows copyright holders to easily identify and monetize their content on YouTube.

An overly simple example: You use a Justin Bieber song in your video. Content ID scans the video and flags it. You have a window of time to appeal it. During that time, Justin Bieber makes all the revenue from your video. If your appeal doesn’t go through, all the money from that video will go to Justin Bieber. Forever.

Of course, you aren’t going to use a Justin Bieber song. The above example is how the system is supposed to work. Unfortunately, the real problem are Content ID claims from shady companies. Videos have even gotten flagged for featuring chirping birds in the background. It’s very similar to patent trolling. This is one of the reasons you have to be really careful when using stock music on YouTube. Several creators in the program had Content ID claims on some very high profit videos on which they had used legally licensed stock music. Their appeals didn’t go through and they lost all the revenues on those videos. Personally, I’ve had two videos flagged with no reason given. The only music used in the videos are ambient tracks made with Garage Band loops. I own the license to Garage Band and this still wasn’t good enough. Even though I appealed it to YouTube AND own the rights to all the content, someone else now makes the revenue from those videos.

This is a major problem. The people from YouTube we talked to know it’s a major problem but there doesn’t seem to be anything in the pipeline that’s going to fix it.

TIP: Be VERY careful about the music and sound effects you use in your videos. Garage Band loops are incredibly risky. I’ve never had a problem with Premium Beat or the Vimeo Music library. Keep records of every piece of music. I would go as far as printing out the licenses and keeping them somewhere very safe. If you can’t prove that you own the rights to everything in your video, somebody else might end up earning money from it.

5. YouTube Wants You To Succeed

Considering it is a free platform on which anybody can make and share videos, there is a LOT of hate out there for YouTube. And let’s face facts, it can be easy to hate. We were at the Space for week 2 of the program when the notorious Google+ comments switchover happened. It did not go over well. Even though YouTube had funded an amazing trip for all of us, the rage was palpable. You would have thought that Google was killing kittens.

Every tiny change to YouTube provokes a huge uproar of angry complaints and threats to leave YouTube. I’ve been guilty of this almost every time YouTube has rolled out new features. But ultimately, people who are much smarter than me are steering the direction of the platform in a direction that they think will create more views and more money. Your success on YouTube means that YouTube makes even more money.

YouTube can seem like a faceless machine when you are first starting out. But there are real people hard at work behind the scenes. All of the YouTube staff involved with the program were incredibly smart, nice and helpful. They were authentically invested in helping us make better videos and grow stronger channels. Of course with an hour of video uploaded every second, even a massive company like YouTube is not going to have enough staff to help everybody.

It’s definitely a tiered system and it isn’t perfect by any means. Your channel won’t even be on their radar until you have 10,000 subs or a ridiculous viral hit. But as you put in the time and build a following for your channel, you will start to gradually see the human face of YouTube. Despite having some medium sized channels, I still often feel like I am on the bottom rung of the ladder. But when I step back and look at it, YouTube has really made what I do possible. In addition to building a great platform, I’ve had the opportunity to take part in programs like the YouTube Creator Accelerator, YouTube Next Chef and more.

(Now if they can just do something about Content ID.)

TIP: I don’t have anything ground-breaking on this one and I refuse to be another person telling you to make better videos and everything will fall into place. Spend some time checking out the YouTube Creators Hub. Stay up to date on the Playbook. If there is any YouTube program or contest that fits what you’re doing, ask your viewers to nominate you for it. Getting accepted into YouTube Next Chef was a huge turning point for our channel. On The Rise is another great program. These are all great ways to get on the radars of actual people at YouTube.

IN CLOSING

I feel really honored to have been part of the YouTube Creator Accelerator. It was a great experience and while the education was great, the best part was connecting with other video creators. It’s easy to feel like you are creating all of this stuff in a vacuum. Most people have no understanding of what I really do. Then suddenly you are in a room filled with 50 people who all “get it” and are doing similar things.

The YouTube ecosystem is a real and growing thing. There are huge corporations investing lots of money in online video. But to me the really exciting part are the thousands of thriving businesses being built out of people’s houses. A few years ago I never thought I would make my living producing a cooking show in my kitchen. But now that show is seen all over the world and the business around it continues to grow every day.

This is a very exciting time.

This is not movies. This is not TV. This is not radio.

Online video is a new medium and we are here on the ground floor of it.

BONUS TIP

Pann’s has the best biscuits and gravy I’ve ever eaten.

Pann's restaurant
Pann’s Restaurant

Yoga With Adriene – Progress Update

ywa-reboot-shoot
It’s been a little over a year since we launched Yoga With Adriene. I figured it was time to finally update you on how things are going.

Right now we’ve got almost 40,000 YouTube subscribers and our daily video views are consistent and trending upwards. Our email list is healthy and growing (despite a lot of neglect). We also just had a very successful product launch. Despite some really bumpy spots in 2013, I think things are actually going really well.

YouTube views for Yoga With Adriene
YouTube views for the Yoga With Adriene channel.

I knew YWA had a lot of potential, but I had always planned on using it as a case study. I had learned a lot through the creation and production of Hilah Cooking and I wanted to implement some of those things and launch a new project. Yoga seemed like the perfect fit and I knew Adriene would be the perfect host.
Continue reading “Yoga With Adriene – Progress Update”

How To Integrate Google+ With Your YouTube Channel

google+youtube-integration

UPDATED: This post has generated a ton of feedback and I’ve tried to respond to all of it. There may be some minor differences between your control panels and what you see in the screen captures. So if you don’t see the setting you’re looking for in the exact location shown in this tutorial, keep looking. Since writing this post, I’ve connected all my channels to Google+ pages and it’s worked like a charm. If you’re still on the fence, rumor has it that there are more Pages features in the pipeline and some of these will directly impact your YouTube channel. I suggest working out the kinks now so you can take advantage of them as soon as possible.

I’ve been getting lots of questions lately about how to connect Google+ to a YouTube channel. Google has been changing things up so rapidly that to be honest I’ve just now figured out a system that I like.

This post will show you how to do it step-by-step and there are two reasons I really recommend you take the time.

1. If you’re not taking advantage of Google+ you’re missing out and you’re falling behind. If you’ve been dragging your heels it’s time to give it another look. Get rid of your preconceptions and stop thinking of it as a Facebook competitor. Think of it as a connective layer that ties the various Google services together. There is a social component to it, but it’s not for talking to your high school friends. It’s for communicating with people you don’t know yet. It’s also the most effective tool at the moment for getting your content ranked quickly in Google search.

2. By connecting your YouTube channel to a Google+ page, you can have multiple managers for the channel. In addition to the channels I’m personally working on, I can now have a client give me access to their channel without giving me their log-in information. This is huge. It also allows me to access everything I need from one account. The levels of control are still very basic right now so you still need to trust the people you assign as Managers, but it’s way better than giving your login and password out to someone every time you need a little help.

3. You now have a lot more options for naming your Channel. On the Yoga With Adriene channel we were stuck for a long time with an awkward channel name because we had set up a main Google profile which requires a real first and last name. Now that we’ve associated it with the Yoga With Adriene page, it appears exactly how we want it to and we have started really climbing the search engine results since doing it.

In this tutorial, I’m using an example called SuperCinematico! It’s an idea for a goofy channel I’ve had for awhile. I’m not sure I will get around to actually producing content for it, but I’m using it as one of the example channels in my upcoming YouTube book. Here we go…

1. Set Up a Google Account

If you’ve already got a Google account or YouTube Channel you can skip to step #3. This is your base account and will give you access to all the Google services: Gmail, YouTube, Google+ etc. So pick a name that will work good as an email address. For now, set it up using your “real” name or at least a name that sounds like a real person. Google+ wants “real” person names not brand names for the profile pages.

YouTube account setup

2. Go to YouTube and Pick a Channel Name.

You only get one shot at setting this part up, but it’s very important. Whatever you set up here is going to be your permanent YouTube URL. Go to your YouTube settings and pick a name that is easy to remember and easy to type in. In an ideal scenario, I would be able to get supercinematico but it’s already taken. At this stage you can’t choose names with spaces or punctuation. We’ll get to that a little bit later.

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Luckily supercinematicotv is available. If you were able to register a Gmail account you should be able to get it for your YouTube channel. This is easy enough so I’ going to go with this.

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One this refreshes, go check out your channel. You’ll see that the new username is in all the important places. But we’re not done yet.

 

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3. Setup a Google+ Page

Ultimately we want the YouTube Channel connected to a Google+ Page. So bounce back over to Google+ and choose Pages from the main drop down menu.

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Click “Create a page.”

 

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Select a category for your page. This doesn’t seem to be hugely important yet so don’t waste a lot of time deciding. Just pick something that seems to fit with your channel. I’m going for Entertainment.

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Choose a name for your page. Unlike with Google+ profiles you aren’t limited to a first and last name. You can have a single word or multiple. This is one of the BIG advantages to setting up a G+ page. So get your brand in here. If you have a website, enter it in for external website. I don’t have the website set up yet, so I’m just going to link to the YouTube channel.

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Connect your YouTube Channel to your Google+ Page

Now go back to your YouTube settings and click “Link channel with Google+”

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Now that your channel is linked up, you’ve got a lot more options! You can use the name of your G+ Page, your username or you can choose a name. But now you’ve got options for spaces and punctuation. And now everything is legit as far as Google/YouTube is concerned.

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Click Next and you’ll see that the channel has been updated with the name of the G+ page – or – the better name you chose in the previous step.

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Set up Managers for the Page (and by default, your Channel)

Bounce back over to your Google+ page and click on the Managers tab. I like to have the ability to manage channels and pages through my primary account. It reduces the amount of time I have to log-in and log-out and also helps reduce errors. If you are working as part of a team, you can also add your other team members as managers. This will allow them to control pretty much everything, so make sure you really trust them. Click “Add managers.”

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Add the email address of the person you want to set up as a manager. Once they accept, they will appear as one of the page managers. In this case, I added myself.

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Now when I’m logged into my main Google account I can access all the sites I’m currently working on from the “Switch account” drop-down menu.

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